Event List

Events are divided into B Division and C Division, for middle-school and high-school teams respectively.  Each division has 23 events, which may be shared across divisions.  Most events are designed for up to two students and, while a single student can participate, he or she will be at a disadvantage.  With only 15 students to a team, scheduling your team can certainly be challenging.

Typically, one group of two students should train in 3-4 events.  (15 students/2 per event = 7.5 groups; 23 events/7.5 group = 3.07 events per group) Once registration has opened for the upcoming competition, you will be able to select one of several sections for each event.  Carefully choosing non-overlapping sections in which your groups have been training is going to crucial to your team's success overall.

Below is a table of events for this year's competition.  Clicking on a link will take you to the resources and links provided by the national olympiad committee.

Division B Events Division C Events
Life, Personal, & Social Sciences Anatomy and Physiology
Disease Detective
Heredity
Ornithology
Water Quality
Life, Personal, & Social Sciences Anatomy and Physiology
Designer Genes
Disease Detectives
Ornithology
Water Quality
Earth & Space Science

Dynamic Planet
Fossils
Meteorology
Reach for the Stars
Road Scholar

Earth & Space Science Astronomy
Dynamic Planet
Fossils
GeoLogic Mapping
Physical Science & Chemistry

Circuit Lab
Crime Busters
Density Lab
Food Science
Machines

Physical Science & Chemistry Chemistry Lab
Circuit Lab
Forensics
Machines
Protein Modeling
Sounds of Music
Technology & Engineering

Boomilever
Elastic Launched Glider
Mission Possible
Mousetrap Vehicle

Technology & Engineering

Boomilever
Detector Building
Gravity Vehicle
Wright Stuff

Inquiry & Nature of Science Experimental Design
Game On
Ping Pong Parachute
Write It Do It
Inquiry & Nature of Science Codebusters
Experimental Design
Ping Pong Parachute
Write It Do It

The YouTube playlist below is taken from the official Science Olympiad website, and gives several examples of what an event looks like: